DEMANDING LAND: Muzila

The Francistown City Council has rejected a proposal by Tati Company over a protracted farm measuring approximately 139 hectares within the free hold land owned by the British registered firm.

FCC’s several attempts to gain full access to the farm has been hindered by the fact that TC has sold another plot right in front of the city council’s farm, blocking their only access to the farm.

Since 2016 TC, which is registered as a real estate entity has denied FCC access to the NQ91 farm and sometimes grants the council controlled access.

In her address at a Full Council session, Mayor Sylvia Muzila revealed that TC has proposed that they should access the farm by the quarry road that connects to the A1 road at Tati Siding.

She said this could not be acceptable as the entrance to the farm is on the eastern side, being closer to the Mambo Treatment plant with laid down pipes connecting it to the plant.

“These can still be resuscitated and be used if need be. This is reason enough not to accept the Tati Company’s proposal, which would be costly to us and calling for a budget to create the servitude,” Muzila said.

The Mayor further said she had hoped that the matter would be settled amicably. “But it seems we are not able to reach a consensus,” she said.

In a breakfast meeting between Tati Company and the city council in October some Councillors called on government to expropriate tracts of land owned by the Tati company as they believe are proceeds of a colonial blunder.

Speaking during the meeting Tati Company Limited General Manager, Ogaisitse Khama, said there were a lot of misconceptions about the company’s land ownership.

Khama, however, said that he noted the concerns of the civic leaders and was looking forward to working with them to resolve issues of concern.

He said the company and FCC were partners in development, adding that at independence, most of the land in the North East District belonged to Tati Company, which is currently owned by the Bernard Glazer Trust, incorporated in South Africa.

“Land ownership in the North East District has historically been disputed due to displacement during internecine warfare during nation building periods,” Khama told the councillors.

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